Tuesday, June 4, 2013

365 Day of Floral Education - Days 106 - 110

As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

 Day 106 – The red rose has long been the traditional Valentine's Day flower. The red rose is also the favorite rose of Venus, goddess of love and that is the main reason the red rose has the meaning of passion and love, making it a Valentine favorite.




Day 107 - The gerbera daisy was discovered in 1884 near Barberton, South Africa, by Scotsman Robert Jameson. While the flower's scientific name, Gerbera jamesonii, recollects the name of its founder, the meaning of its common name draws from German naturalist Traugott Gerber. Breeding programs that began in England in 1890 enhanced the flower's quality and color variations. The gerbera daisy's popularity soon traveled to growers in the Netherlands which, along with Columbia, is the primary distributor of the flower's cut version today. The gerbera currently ranks as the fifth most popular flower in the world behind the rose, carnations, chrysanthemum, and tulip.





Day 108 - Hardy cacti and other succulent plants are accustomed to desert conditions and prefer bright, indirect light or direct sun. Water them thoroughly and evenly, allowing them to dry out completely in between waterings. If the soil becomes too hard and causes water to run off, place the pot in water just to cover the soil, and allow it to soak for about 30 minutes.










Day 109 - Calla lily plants thrive in slightly cool, sunny spots, especially after their blooms open. Check their soil frequently and keep it moist but not soggy. These bulb-like plants grow from rhizomes, and when they're finished blooming, you can plant them outdoors in mild climates. They need a winter rest period before reblooming, so allow them to dry out over the winter.






Day 110 – Among the oldest families of flowers on earth, dating back 300 million years, Greek legend tells us that protea were named after Proteus, the son of Poseidon. A sea god who had the power to know all things past, present and future, Proteus was defiant and preferred to nap on the island of Pharos rather than prophesize. To deter those seeking his insights, he would change his shape at will, and it’s said that the protea flower was named after him, because it too presents itself in an astounding variety of shapes, sizes, hues and textures to make up more than 1,400 varieties. With its mythological associations to change and transform, it’s not surprising that in the language of flowers, protea symbolizes diversity and courage.

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 101 - 105

As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

Day 101 - Legend has it that the amaryllis - the stunning red flower we've come to associate with the holidays - began as a shy, timid nymph. Amaryllis fell deeply in love with Alteo, a shepherd with Hercules' strength and Apollo's beauty, but her affections were unrequited. Hoping that she could win him over by bestowing upon him the thing he desired most - a flower so unique it had never existed in the world before - Amaryllis sought advice from the oracle of Delphi. Following his instructions, Amaryllis dressed in maiden's white and appeared at Alteo's door for 30 nights, each time piercing her heart with a golden arrow. When at last Alteo opened his door, there before him was a striking crimson flower, sprung from the blood of Amaryllis's heart. With this romantic - albeit tragic - tale as its beginning, it's not surprising that today the amaryllis has come to symbolize pride, determination and radiant beauty.

Day 102 - Wax flower gets its name from the tough, waxy feel of the tiny flowers. It smells pine-y fresh and wonderful, especially when the stems are broken or the petals are crushed. Wax flower comes in basic white and pink colors, but it is available in an array of other colors as well, thanks to floral dyes. With its multiple tiny bowl shaped flowers it is a beautiful subtle accent for many bouquets.





Day 103 - Native to Ireland, Scotland, Scandinavia, Russia and North America, heather branches are said to have been used to make baskets, rope, bedding, as thatch for roofs and even to flavor beer or tea. Today, it’s the beautiful heather flowers—in colors ranging from white to pink, purple and red – that draw our attention. Symbolizing admiration and good luck, heather is also believed have protective powers.














Day 104 - The traditional floral symbol of China, the state flower of Indiana, and the 12th wedding anniversary flower, peonies are known as the flower of riches and honor. With their lush, full, rounded bloom, peonies embody romance and prosperity and are regarded as an omen of good fortune and a happy marriage.






Day 105 – The story of lilac, according to Greek mythology, begins with a beautiful nymph named Syringa (lilac’s botanical name). Captivated by her beauty, Pan, the god of the forests and fields, chased Syringa through the forest. Frightened by Pan’s affections, Syringa escaped him by turning herself into an aromatic bush – the flower we now refer to as lilac.

Sunday, February 10, 2013

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 96-100

As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.
Day 96 - Named after Charles Bouvard, the personal physician to Louis XIII and the superintendent of the Royal Gardens in Paris, modern varieties of bouvardia have names such as Pink Luck, Albatross and Royal Katty. Their star-like flowers grow in clusters on thin, branching stems, like small flower bouquets in soft shades of pink, white, yellow, salmon and red. With a delicate scent and feminine appearance, in the language of flowers, bouvardia represent enthusiasm.

Day 97 - With a host of names – from Texas Bluebell to Prairie Gentian to Lira de San Pedro – lisianthus symbolize an outgoing nature. Native to Texas and Mexico, and descended from a North American wildflower, in their single-form variety, lisianthus may resemble tulips or poppies. In their double form, they can take on the appearance of roses or peonies. With wide ruffled, delicate petals and oval leaves, in colors ranging from white to pink, lavender to purple and bicolors such as blue-violet, it’s said that lisianthus also symbolize appreciation.

Day 98 - Legend has it that Queen Anne, the wife of King James I, was challenged by her friends to create lace as beautiful as a flower. While making the lace, she pricked her finger, and it’s said that the purple-red flower in the center of Queen Anne’s Lace represents a droplet of her blood. Also called Wild Carrot (since Queen Anne’s Lace is the wild progenitor of today’s carrot), Bishop’s Lace or Bird’s Nest (for the nest-like appearance of the bright white and rounded flower in full bloom), in the language of flowers, Queen Anne’s Lace represents sanctuary.

Day 99 - Native to Asia and celebrated for its medicinal properties as well as its bright beauty, the small camellia-like ranunculus ranges from white to pink, red to yellow to orange. Also known as Buttercup and Coyote’s Eyes, legend has it that the mythological Coyote was tossing his eyes up in the air and catching them when Eagle snatched them. Unable to see, Coyote created eyes from the buttercup. In the language of flowers, a bouquet of ranunculus says, “I am dazzled by your charms.”





Day 100 - With its richly colored yet small, delicate flowers, the sweet pea’s history can be traced back to 17th century Italy, when a Sicilian monk, Franciscus Cupani, sent its seeds to England. Although that original sweet pea bore little resemblance to the flower we know today, when Harry Eckford, a Scottish nurseryman, crossbred the original flower, he created the colorful, ornamental and sweetly scented sweet pea we know today. Ekford’s varieties included the pink Dorothy Eckford, the lavender Lady Grisel Hamilton, the scarlet King Edward VII and perhaps his most famous, the Countess Spencer. Meaning delicate or blissful pleasure in the language of flowers, this enchanting flower remains a favorite fragrant blossom.

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 91-95

Steins at Sunset Florist (our Burlington, NJ location)
employees Chris and Jessica can't believe how
huge these leaves are!
As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

Day 91 – Monstera palms can grow huge leaves with wonderful ornamental appeal. Place your Monstera in an area of your home where it can receive high amounts of indirect light. The more light it receives the larger the plant’s leaves and their slits will be, which adds to the beauty of the plant. Place the plant near an east or south facing window.

Day 92 - The iris's mythology dates back to Ancient Greece, when the goddess Iris, who personified the rainbow (the Greek word for iris), acted as the link between heaven and earth. It's said that purple irises were planted over the graves of women to summon the goddess Iris to guide them in their journey to heaven. Irises became linked to the French monarchy during the Middle Ages, eventually being recognized as their national symbol, the fleur-de-lis.

Day 93 - Named after the German physician Friedrich Heinrich Theodor Freese, freesia – with their bell-shaped blooms and sweet, citrus scent – are among the most popular fragrant flowers. And, while in most cases the white variation of a flower is the most fragrant, in the case of freesia, the pink and red varieties are actually more highly scented. With their wiry stems and delicate blooms, it’s not surprising that one of the most popular freesia varieties is named Ballerina.

Day 94 - Named for the shape of their leaves, gladioli – from the Latin word “gladius,” meaning sword – have a history than spans from Africa to the Mediterranean. Symbolizing strength and moral integrity, gladioli also represent infatuation, with a bouquet conveying to a recipient that they pierce the giver’s heart with passion.












Day 95 - Blue flowers hold a special significance in the language of flowers and apparently – given their long-standing popularity – a special place in our hearts as well. Whether it’s the deep blue petals of an iris or the light blue lace of hydrangea, the wildflower beauty of blue star anemone or the dramatic arch of blue delphinium, blue flowers offer a cooling antidote to our over-stimulated lives and anxious days. A color that is known to hold universal appeal, blue plays a significant role in many cultures’ religious rituals and ceremonies. It’s said that the Western tradition of a bride wearing something blue is tied to the color’s symbolism of faithfulness and loyalty. In its dark, regal tones, blue can express trustworthiness, confidence, intelligence and unity, which explains why it’s frequently the color of police uniforms, why the blue “power suit” is an icon of the business world and why winners of competitions receive blue ribbons. And yet, in its softer hues, blue can embody the uplifting spirit of a sunny sky or soothing ocean – perhaps explaining why so many of us choose blue flowers when we want to send a message of calming beauty, tranquility and peace.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 86-90


As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

Day 86 - Derived from the Greek words “anti,” meaning like, and “rhin,” meaning nose, antirrhinum, the snapdragon’s botanical name, is a fitting description of this snout-shaped flower. It’s said that the common name for this colorful flower comes from the snap it makes when the sides of the “dragon’s mouth” are gently squeezed. While their actual origin is unknown, it’s believed that snapdragons were originally wildflowers in Spain and Italy. Legend has it that concealing a snapdragon makes a person appear fascinating and cordial, and in the language of flowers, snapdragons are said to represent both deception (perhaps tied to the notion of concealment) and graciousness.

Day 87 - The most obvious and well known meaning of the red rose is deep love and affection. In the 18th century, a special rose language evolved as a means of communication between lovers who were forced by society to keep their feelings a secret. And the red rose came to symbolize true love that would stand the test of time. Staunchly promising affection that is forever riding high is what the red rose means. The red rose denotes a true love that is stronger than thorns and can outlive all obstacles.

Day 88 - Through ancient societies, the aster flower has come to be known as a symbol of charm and patience as well as refinement and elegance. The Ancients also believe that, by burning aster leaves, they could drive away serpents with the smell as well as be used as a love charm. Today, the message conveyed by giving asters can be sometimes taken as a lack of trust that a person has remained faithful. The flower offers a unique beauty that has also offered some medicinal properties. It is related to other flowers, such as mums, marigolds, and daisies.

Day 89 - With a recorded history that dates back thousands of years, it’s not surprising that even the mythology surrounding the origin of the peony has multiple versions. One legend has it that the peony is named after Paeon, a physician to the gods, who received the flower on Mount Olympus from the mother of Apollo. And another tells the story of that same physician who was “saved” from the fate of dying as other mortals by being turned into the flower we know today as the peony.

Day 90 - There remains some debate over the hydrangea’s symbolism – with some connecting it to vanity and boastfulness (perhaps reflecting its abundance of petals and lavish, rounded shape) and others suggesting that a bouquet of hydrangea expresses the giver’s gratefulness for the recipient’s understanding. Still others suggest it represents anything that’s sincerely heartfelt. Despite this variation in flower meaning, there appears to be an overwhelming consensus that this 4th wedding anniversary flower possesses enduring grace and beauty.

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 81-85

As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

Day 81 - The Monte Casino Flower is also known as the Heath Aster or the Monte Casino Aster. It is native to the Central and Eastern part of the United States as well as Canada. It is commonly found as a small filler flower in arrangements on a year-round basis and is a common pick among florists. It is found as part of a clump forming bush that grows up to three feet in height and approximately a foot in width. Colors for the Monte Casino Flower include star-shaped blossoms in purple, lavender, and white with a yellow center.

Day 82 - To care for your cut hyacinths simply provide them with cool clear water. Do not let the flowers fall below the water's surface, as this could cause extra bacteria production, reducing the longevity of the blooms. A floral food formulated specifically for bulb plants may also add to their vase life; however, hyacinths do not show a particular affinity for it. If the basal plate (the spot at the bottom of the stem that looks as though it had roots) is present that's great, don't remove it, it will lengthen the life of your blooms!

Day 83 – Carnations are rich with symbolism, mythology and even debate, and with a history that dates back more than 2,000 years, it's not surprising. While some scholars suggest that their name comes from the word "corone" (flower garlands) or "coronation" because of its use in Greek ceremonial crowns, others propose that it’s derived from the Latin "carnis" (flesh) referring to the flower's original pinkish-hued color or "incarnacyon" (incarnation), referring to the incarnation of God-made flesh.



Day 84 - Heather’s scientific name, “Calluna vulgaris,” comes from the Greek “Kallune,” meaning “to clean or brush,” and the Latin “vulgaris,” meaning “common,” as heather twigs were once used for making brooms.

Day 85 - It is estimated that bamboo has been a symbol of good fortune in the Asian culture more than 4,000 years. Lucky bamboo is one of the plants recommended by Feng Shui masters to improve Feng Shui and create a space where you feel safe and more energized. Because lucky bamboo is able to thrive in many areas of the home or workplace where other plants would not, it is valued as a means to enhance the positive flow of energy or "chi" in these areas.

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 76-80

As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

Day 76 - The Pink Intuition is a bi-colored rose splashed with artistic streaks of light and hot pink. Imported from Ecuador, they are a hit with florists and rose appreciators alike. The varieties Red Intuition delstriro (a red with red streaks) and Pink Intuition delstripink, were created by Delbard. Delbard is a French company located in the center of France in the region Auvergne, which specializes in the breeding of roses and fruit trees. Delbard has been breeding different varieties for both for more than 70 years.

Day 77 - A symbol of the sun, the Japanese consider the orderly unfolding of the chrysanthemum’s petals to represent perfection, and Confucius once suggested they be used as an object of meditation. It’s said that a single petal of this celebrated flower placed at the bottom of a wine glass will encourage a long and healthy life.

Day 78 - Inventor Thomas Edison experimented with solidego to produce rubber, which it contains naturally. Edison created a fertilization and cultivation process to maximize the rubber content in each plant. His experiments produced a 12-foot-tall plant that yielded as much as 12% rubber. The tires on the Model T given to him by his friend Henry Ford were made from goldenrod.

Day 79 - Ornithogalum umbellatum or Star of Bethlehem flower is a perennial plant with small, delicate flowers. It is also known by other names that include Wonder Flower and Arabian Star Flower. Sometimes it is called the “florist nightmare” as the Star of Bethlehem have a very long shelf life. If growing these beauties in your garden keep them away from livestock and other animals. The bulbs and foliage contain toxic alkaloids. Thus, grow them in areas that won't tempt your dog, cat or other pets to take a sample bite of the leaves. The Star of Bethlehem is the symbol of purity, atonement and reconciliation.

Day 80 – Yarrow was once regarded as a sacred and medicinal herb. Yarrow stems were used by the Druids to divine seasonal weather in Europe and were the original stalks used by the Chinese in consulting the I-ching. It also was strongly used by wise women and healers in Europe and during the Middle Ages, it was used to keep evil spirits away and worn as an amulet to ward against negativity. Yarrow is said to symbolize war. We love its beautiful yellow hue and versatility, it’s wonderful as a fresh or dried flower.

Monday, January 14, 2013

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 71-75

As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

Day 71 – Green ball or Green Trick Dianthus is a wonderful and unique new variety of dianthus developed by the breeder Hilverda. It is looking to be a favorite for modern wedding bouquets, especially with Pantone’s color for 2013 being Emerald. The extraordinary pompom shaped, green flowers are ~2” wide and last an incredible 4 to 6 weeks in a vase! This modern relative of the ever popular Sweet William performs superbly in gardens and flowers within just 8 weeks of planting.

Day 72 – Solidego, commonly known as goldenrods, are considered weeds by many in North America but they are prized as garden plants in Europe, where British gardeners adopted solidego long before Americans did as garden subjects. Solidego only began to gain some acceptance in American gardening (other than wildflower gardening) during the 1980s. Solidego is commonly used for ornamental purposes in the floral industry and is said to be a sign of good luck or good fortune.

Day 73 - Also known as the Flamingo Flower, Boy Flower, Painted Tongue and Painter's Palette – because of their distinctive shape and color – the name anthurium comes from Greek, meaning "tail flower." Exotic and compelling, with bold, typically red flowers and shiny, dark green foliage, anthurium, like the hospitality they represent, are long-lasting and irresistibly beautiful.

Day 74 - Since 2001, when imports of cut Hypericum were finally allowed into the U.S market, there’s been an explosion of new varieties and colors available. What was known, until not long ago, as primarily a burgundy colored berried branch is now available in bright red, orange, peach, coral, pink, cream, yellow, green and even white! These developments, combined with the perfect high altitude growing conditions for Hypericum in Ecuador, have given us a wonderful array of trendy berries to add to floral designs year round.

Day 75 - A symbol of happy life and contented existence, the stock flower, with its sweet, heady-scented blooms, is native to Southwestern Greece and the Mediterranean. Typically found in white, pink, red or lilac, stock is also called gillyflower or Virginia stock.

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 66-70

As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

Day 66 – With a history that dates back to 15th century B.C., chrysanthemum mythology is filled with a multitude of stories and symbolism. Named from the Greek prefix “chrys-” meaning golden (its original color) and “-anthemion,” meaning flower, years of artful cultivation have produced a full range of colors, from white to purple to red. Daisy-like with a typically yellow center and a decorative pompon, chrysanthemums symbolize optimism and joy.


Day 67 – Resembling a miniature lily, alstroemeria, often called the Peruvian Lily or Lily of the Incas, was named after its discoverer, Baron Claus von Alstromer, a Swedish baron who collected the seeds on a trip to Spain in 1753. Today, this popular flower can be found in a range of colors – from white to golden yellow, orange to apricot, pink to red, lavender and purple. Symbolizing friendship and devotion, the alstroemeria’s leaves grow upside down, with the leaf twisting as it grows out from the stem, so that the bottom is facing upwards. It symbolizes friendship and devotion.


Day 68 – This is silver Kochia, a cultivar of the Kochia scrophularia of the Negev desert in Israel, which is itself a tumbleweed, that many claim to be the mythical burning bush of Hebrew folk-lore. When in cultivation this invasive weed is quite attractive, turning bright red in the fall, which when viewed with a setting sun illuminating it could easily be a “burning bush”. However, the cultivar we use in the floral industry is a silvery-gray color, with erect stiff stems and felt-like foliage. Kochia is a useful and hardy foliage with good architectural qualities. Leaves and stems should be turgid and gray-white, neither blackening nor yellowing. Stems should be cut cleanly and crisply and placed immediately into water. Any leaves that will be submerged should be removed. Its vase life is 7-10 days.


Day 69 - The most commonly used delphinium variety is the delphinium staphisagria, which is thought to be helpful in curing diseases or irritations of the reproductive system, as well as aiding in mental and acute respiratory ailments. These flowers may also be used to repel pests such as lice, and are thought to have a curative effect on scorpion stings. The delphinium flower is said to represent big-heartedness and the essence of divine qualities. They are also meant to symbolize levity, fun and a general sense of joy.


Day 70 - Dendrobium is a huge genus of orchids established by Olof Swartz in 1799 and today contains about 1,200 species. They are found in diverse habitats throughout much of Asia, including the Philippines, Borneo, Australia, New Guinea, Solomon Islands and New Zealand. Many of the orchids that we import are from Thailand, where there are several major growers of a variety of orchids including dendrobiums, cymbidiums, phalaenopsis, vanda, mokara, oncidium and cattleya.

365 Days of Floral Education - Days 61-65

As part of our 125th Anniversary celebration at Stein Your Florist Co. we are sharing a year of floral education, November 1, 2012 thru October 31, 2013. Each day we will post something new on our Facebook page to share our knowledge of our favorite things, flowers and plants and we'll be updating our blog every 5 days or so. No need for pencils and notebooks, just sharing some simple lessons in floristry.

Day 61 - First discovered in Japan, the name hydrangea comes from the Greek “hydor,” meaning water, and “angos,” meaning jar or vessel. This roughly translates to “water barrel,” referring to the hydrangea’s need for plenty of water and its cup-shaped flower. With its wooden stems and lacy, star-shaped flowers packed closely together in a pompom, the hydrangea’s color ranges from white to blue to pink and purple, determined by the acidity level of the soil.

Day 62 – The beginning of January has primrose plants popping up in flower shops and markets all along the east coast. With a vast array of colorful blooms they are a cool weather favorite of many flowering plant lovers and perfect to keep indoors this time of year. They enjoy bright light and cool temperatures, so a nice sunny window away from the heat is a great location for your indoor flowering garden. They like to stay moist, but not wet. Because of their need to be moist and cool, some leaf mold or fungus growth may occur, simply remove any troubled leaves and enjoy.

Day 63 - Grown for both its colorful flowers and its everlasting calyx (the green leaf that encloses the flower bud), statice is also considered an herb, referred to as “sea lavender.” Statice is commonly used in dried flower arrangements as well as fresh bouquets. Its botanical name is derived from the Greek word “limonium,” meaning meadow, referring to the plants original habitat and likely why this versatile flower is also called marsh-rosemary. With a misty and seafoam appearance (two more names associated with this wildflower-like plant), in the language of flowers, statice symbolizes remembrance.

Day 64 - The Matsumoto aster is a fast-growing annual that has long, sturdy stems along with long-lasting flowers. It is native to East Asia and was developed in Japan. It is prized among both home gardeners and commercial floral growers. It tends to last between seven and ten days, depending on the bud stage and is good only as a fresh flower as it does not dry well. It is best to re-cut it about a half-inch from the base of each stem while it is still under water. The water should be changed out every three days and no foliage should be submerged in water or this may lead to bacterial growth.

Day 65 – Many of us remember dyeing flowers as children for a school experiment with food coloring or ink, but floral processors dye flowers by the thousands. Typically flowers are dyed through absorption, the dye is in the water and taken in through the stem and into the petals as the flower drinks, but immersion is another, faster method, where the flowers are dip-dyed. When dyeing fresh cut flowers the dyes are generally used at the rate of 1-2 ounces per gallon of water. One pound of dye tints approximately 5,000-10,000 stems. That’s a lot more than we remember dyeing in elementary school! The daisy pom pons pictured here have been dyed a fun neon pink!